play fast and loose with sb/sth
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British pronunciation/plˈeɪ fˈast and lˈuːs wɪð ˌɛsbˈiː slˈaʃ ˌɛstˌiːˈeɪtʃ/
American pronunciation/plˈeɪ fˈæst ænd lˈuːs wɪð ˌɛsbˈiː slˈæʃ ˌɛstˌiːˈeɪtʃ/
01

to act toward a person or thing without enough care, seriousness, or sense of responsibility

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to [play] fast and loose with {sb/sth} definition and meaning

What is the origin of the idiom "play fast and loose with someone or something" and when to use it?

The origin of the idiom "play fast and loose with someone or something" can be traced back to medieval games of chance, particularly a game called "fast and loose" that was popular in the 16th century. In this game, a belt or cord was looped in intricate patterns, and participants were challenged to unravel it while betting money. The person running the game would manipulate the loops to make it seem easy to win, but it was designed to deceive and take people's money. It is used in various situations, such as discussions about trust, relationships, ethics, and responsibility.

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Example
examples
The con artist played fast and loose with the elderly couple's savings, convincing them to invest in a fraudulent scheme.
He played fast and loose with his employees' trust by promising job security and then making abrupt layoffs.
The politician was known for playing fast and loose with the facts, distorting information to suit his agenda.
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Meaning of "To [play] fast and loose with {sb/sth}"
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