Out of the frying pan (and) into the fire

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British pronunciation/ˌaʊtəv ðə fɹˈaɪɪŋ pˈan and ˌɪntʊ ðə fˈaɪə/
American pronunciation/ˌaʊɾəv ðə fɹˈaɪɪŋ pˈæn ænd ˌɪntʊ ðə fˈaɪɚ/
out of the frying pan (and) into the fire
01

used when one moves from a bad situation into a worse one

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out of the frying pan (and|) into the fire definition and meaning

What is the origin of the idiom "out of the frying pan, into the fire" and when to use it?

The idiom "out of the frying pan, into the fire" has its origins in medieval Europe, where it was used to describe a situation where someone was trying to escape danger but ended up in an even worse situation. The phrase now means to move from a bad or difficult situation to one that is even worse. This idiom is often used to describe a situation where someone is trying to escape a difficult or unpleasant circumstance, but ends up in a situation that is even more challenging.

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Example
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She is going out of the frying pan and into the fire by quitting her stable job without a backup plan.
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Definition & Meaning of "Out of the frying pan (and|) into the fire"
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